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Thursday 13 September 2012

[2012]
[Wednesday 12 September 2012]
St. Petersburg
During the night I was startled once or twice by the buzzing of a mosquito near my ear. Ca.1.40am there began a severe and prolonged thunderstorm with torrential rain. I was troubled by painful feet. In the morning it was my turn to feel nauseous, but I got myself moving in time for breakfast ca.9am.
Morning tour of the world-renowned Hermitage Museum and an afternoon excursion to Peter and Paul Fortress
We already did the “afternoon excursion to Peter and Paul Fortress” yesterday. We joined our group on the coach at 9.30am, and were dropped off on the east side of the Palace Square. We hung around in the Square for some time, then, via the garden on the southwest side of the Winter Palace, Вера led us to the opposite side of the Palace, along the Palace Embankment, to the entrance to the Hermitage Museum. The museum occupies the Winter Palace and the connected adjacent buildings.
Click on the photos, below, for a larger view.

10:03:36 The General Staff Building on the Palace Square

10:03:36 Detail from the above photo: Triumphal Arch separating the two wings of the General Staff Building

10:03:50 The General Staff Building and Alexander Column on the Palace Square

10:04:32 The Winter Palace on the Palace Square

10:04:32 Detail from the above photo

10:05:18 Triumphal Arch of the General Staff Building

10:05:44 Angel holding a cross atop the Alexander Column

10:06:04 Pedestal of the Alexander Column

10:13:12 Panoramic sweep of the Palace Square

10:21:04 Walking along the Palace Embankment to the entrance of the Hermitage Museum on the opposite side of the Winter Palace

10:23:50 ГОСУДАРСТВЕННЫЙ ЭРМИТАЖ — State Hermitage [Museum]

Janet’s and my tickets (both sides) for the Hermitage Museum
Here are the plans of the three levels of the museum as they appeared on The Hermitage Museum website some weeks later, helping me to locate most of the photos I took on our way round.

Ground floor
1. Jordan Gallery 
2. Room of Ancient Egypt 
3. Room of the Great Vase 
4. The Pompeian Room 
5. The Twenty-Column Hall 
6. The Council Staircase 
7. The Augustus Room 
8. Room of the Culture and Art of the Hellenistic Era 
9. Treasure Gallery I. Room 1
10. Treasure Gallery I. Room 2
11. Treasure Gallery I. Room 3
12. Treasure Gallery I. Room 5
13. Room of the Culture and Art of the Ancient Cities of the Northern Black Sea Area 
14. The Hercules Room 
15. Room of the Art of the Classical Period 
16. The Athena Room 
17. Room of the Art of the Archaic and Early Classical Periods 
18. The Dionysus Room
19. Ancient Courtyard 
20. The Jupiter Hall 
21. The Palaeolithic Room 
22. Room of the Neolithic and Early Bronze Ages 
23. Room of the Bronze Age 
24. Room of the Bronze Age 
25. Room of the Culture and Art of the Nomadic Tribes of the Altai in the 6th to 4th century B.C. 
26. Room of the Culture and Art of the Nomadic Tribes of the Altai in the 6th to 4th century B.C. 
27. Gallery of the Culture of the Peoples of Eastern Europe in the Iron Age 
28. Treasure Gallery II. Room 2
29. Treasure Gallery II. Room 4 
30. The Urartu Room 
31. Room of the Culture of the Tribes of the Northern Caucasus in the Early Middle Ages 
32. Room of the Culture and Art of Ancient Western Asia

First floor
33. Main Staircase of the Winter Palace 
34. The Field Marshals' Room 
35. The Peter the Great (Small Throne) Room 
36. The Armorial Hall 
37. The War Gallery of 1812 
38. The St George Hall 
39. The Great Church 
40. The Picket Room 
41. The Alexander Hall 
42. Room of German Art of the 16th Century 
43. Room of French Art of the 15th to 17th Century 
44. The Poussin Room 
45. The Lorrain Room 
46. Room of French Art of the 18th Century 
47. Room of French Art of the 18th Century 
48. Room of French Art of the 18th Century 
49. Room of French Decorative and Applied Art of the 17th Century 
50. Room of French Decorative and Applied Art of the 17th Century 
51. Room of French Decorative and Applied Art of the 18th Century 
52. The White Hall 
53. The Gold Drawing-room 
54. The Boudoir 
55. The October Staircase 
56. Room of British Art 
57. Room of British Art 
58. Room of the Culture and Art of Russia in the First Half of the 18th Century 
59. Room of the Culture and Art of Russia in the First Half of the 18th Century 
60. Room of the Culture and Art of Russia in the Second Half of the 18th Century 
61. Room of the Culture and Art of Russia in the Second Half of the 18th Century 
62. The Library of Nicholas II 
63. Exhibition: "The Decoration of the Russian Interior in the 19th Century: The Boudoir of the 1840s-1850s" 
64. Exhibition: "The Decoration of the Russian Interior in the 19th Century: The Gambs Room" 
65. The Malachite Room
66. The Small Dining-room 
67. The Concert Hall 
68. The Great (Nicholas) Hall 
69. The Portrait Gallery of the House of the Romanovs 
70. Room Displaying "Unknown Masterpieces" 
71. Room Displaying "Unknown Masterpieces" 
72. The Pavilion Hall 
73. The Hanging Garden 
74. The Western Gallery 
75. Upper Landing of the Council Staircase 
76. Room of Italian Art of the 13th to Early 15th Century 
77. The Leonardo da Vinci Room 
78. Room of Italian Art of the 16th Century 
79. The Titian Room 
80. The Veronese Room 
81. The Majolica Room 
82. The Raphael Loggias 
83. The Knights' Room 
84. The Twelve-Column Hall 
85. The Small Italian Skylight Room 
86. The Italian Cabinet 
87. The Large Italian Skylight Room 
88. The Spanish Cabinet 
89. The Small Spanish Skylight Room 
90. The Gallery of the History of Ancient Painting 
91. The Main Staircase of the New Hermitage 
92. Room of Flemish Art 
93. The Van Dyck Room 
94. The Rubens Room 
95. Room of Netherlandish Art of the Late 16th and 17th Centuries. 
96. The Western Gallery 
97. The Tent-Roofed Room 
98. The Rembrandt Room

Second floor
99. Room of French Art of the 18th and Early 19th Centuries 
100. Room of French Art of the Late 18th and Early 19th Centuries 
101. The Renoir Room 
102. The Monet Room 
103. The Van Gogh Room 
104. The Gauguin Room 
105. The Matisse Room I 
106. The Matisse Room II 
107. Room of French Art of the Early 20th Century 
108. The Picasso Room I 
109. The Picasso Room II 
110. Room of German Art of the 19th Century 
111. Room of European and American Art of the 20th Century 
112. Room of European Art of the 20th Century 
113. The Kandinsky Room 
114. Room of Chinese Art of the 17-18th Centuries
115. Room of Chinese Art 
116. Room of the Art of the Tangut State of Hsi Hsia in the 12th to 14th Century 
117. Room of Artefacts from the Monastery of the Cave of the Thousand Buddhas, Dunhuang 
118. Room of Wall Paintings from the Bezeklik Monastery (Central Asia) 
119. Room of Indian Arms and Applied Art 
120. Room of Indian Miniatures 
121. Room of Ancient and Mediaeval Indian Sculpture 
122. Room of Tibetan Art 
123. Room of Mongolian Art 
124. Room of Artefacts from the Noin Ula burials (Northern Mongolia) 
125. Room of the Art of Byzantium in the 4th to 15th Century (Saltykov Staircase) 
126. Room of the Art of Byzantium in the 4th to 9th Century 
127. Room of the Culture and Art of Byzantium in the 4th to 12th Century 
128. Room of the Art of Byzantium in the 10th to 15th Century 
129. Room of the Culture and Art of Sassanid Iran in the 3rd to 7th Century 
130. Room of Isalamic Art of the Near East 
131. Room of the Culture and Art of Iran from the 16th Century to the First Half of the 19th 
132. Room of the Culture and Art of Iran from the 16th Century to the First Half of the 19th.
We proceeded along the Jordan Gallery (1) to the Main Staircase of the Winter Palace (33).

10:35:34 Jordan Gallery

10:35:34 Jordan Gallery — same view, cropped and enlarged

10:36:16 Approaching the Main Staircase of the Winter Palace

10:37:00 Main Staircase of the Winter Palace

10:37:58 Main Staircase of the Winter Palace

10:38:16 Ceiling painting: Mount Olympus

10:38:16 Ceiling painting: Mount Olympus — part of same view, rotated and straightened up
On the first floor we entered the Field Marshals’ Room (34)—

10:44:06 Entering the Field Marshals’ Room

10:45:46 The Field Marshals’ Room

10:46:12
—then the Peter the Great (Small Throne) Room (35)—

10:46:58 The Peter the Great (Small Throne) Room

10:47:58 The Peter the Great (Small Throne) Room
—then the Armorial Hall (36)—

10:48:24 The Armorial Hall

10:48:48 The Armorial Hall

10:49:08 The Armorial Hall

10:49:54 The Armorial Hall: bowl of the mineral aventurine, made by craftsmen of the Yekaterinburg Lapidary Works (19th century)
—then the War Gallery of 1812 (37).

10:52:14 The War Gallery of 1812

10:52:30 The War Gallery of 1812

10:54:04 Equestrian portrait of Alexander I (Franz Krüger, 1837, oil on canvas)

10:55:06 The War Gallery of 1812

10:56:36

10:57:50
From there we went up to the second floor, to the Room of French Art of the 18th and Early 19th Centuries (99) and several other rooms—

11:00:34 Room of French Art of the 18th and Early 19th Centuries

11:02:36 Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919): Party in the Country at Berneval (1898)

11:03:12 Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919): In the Garden (1885)

11:03:32 Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919):Man on a Stair and Woman on a Stair (ca.1876)

11:04:54 Ferdinand Roybet (1840–1920): An Odalisque (1880s)

11:06:28 Claude Monet (1840–1926): Garden in Bordighera, Impression of Morning (1884)

11:08:02 Vincent Van Gogh (1853–1890): Memory of the Garden at Etten (Ladies of Arles) (1888)

11:09:06 Vincent Van Gogh (1853–1890): The White House at Night (June 1890)

11:10:06 Paul Gaugin (1848–1903): Pastorales tahitiennes (1892)

11:10:44 Paul Gaugin (1848–1903): Nave Nave Moe (Sacred Spring/Sweet Dreams) (1894)
The door out of the Gaugin Room (104) led to a balcony overlooking the first-floor Alexander Hall (41), which in turn led to other second-floor rooms, e.g. the Matisse Rooms (105, 106) and the Picasso Rooms (108, 109).

11:11:22

11:11:54 The Alexander Hall

11:12:38 Maurice Denis (1870–1943): Figures in a Spring Landscape (Sacred Grove) (1897)

11:13:24 Henri Matisse (1869–1954): Lady on a Terrace (1907)

11:13:58 Henri Matisse (1869–1954): Dance (1910)

11:14:46 Henri Matisse (1869–1954): Music (1910)

11:15:24 Henri Matisse (1869–1954): Nude (Black and Gold) (1908)

11:16:40 Henri Matisse (1869–1954): Family Portrait (1911)

11:18:28 André Derain (1880–1954): Martigues (Harbour in Provence) (1913)

11:19:20 Charles Guérin (1875–1939): Nude (1907)

11:20:12 Pablo Picasso (1881–1973): Two Sisters (The Visit) (1902)

11:21:08 Pablo Picasso (1881–1973): Friendship (1908)

11:21:44 Pablo Picasso (1881–1973): Composition with a Skull (1908)

11:22:30 Pablo Picasso (1881–1973): Young Woman (1909)

11:23:00 Pablo Picasso (1881–1973): Violin and Guitar (ca.1912–1913)

11:23:56 Pablo Picasso (1881–1973): Musical Instruments (1912)

11:25:14 Henri Rousseau (1844–1910): Luxembourg Garden. Monument to Chopin (1909)
We went back down to the first floor, to one of the Rooms of British Art (56)—

11:29:02 Michael Dahl (?1659–1743): Portrait of a Lady (ca.1715)

11:30:10 Thomas Gainsborough (1727–1788): Lady in Blue (1780)
—then to the White Hall (52)—

11:32:24 The White Hall

11:34:00 Mahogany bureau with a figure of Apollo (David Roentgen and Peter Kinzing, 1783)

11:35:10 

11:35:34
—then to the Gold Drawing Room (53), then another room—

11:36:26 No photography in the Gold Drawing Room, but my finger slipped!

11:38:32

11:38:58
—then the Boudoir (54) and another room beyond that.

11:39:46 The Boudoir

11:40:22 The Boudoir
From here, 11:40:22 (the Boudoir, 54) to 11:50:34 (the Small Dining Room, 66), I can’t find the locations on the plan — but there are several rooms on the plan that are not numbered.

11:41:12

11:43:52 Vladimir Beklemishev (1861–1920): Sculpural group: Fugitive Slave (Rome, 1891–1892, toned plaster)

11:44:08

11:44:26

11:44:58

11:46:22 Constantine’s Trophies: Tapestry from The Story of Constantine the Great series, cartoon by Peter Paul Rubens, Paris, France (the Raphael de la Planche manufactory, 1633–68, wool and silk)

11:47:36

11:47:54

11:48:34

11:49:34
We went through the Small Dining Room (66), where on the night of 25/26 October 1917 (Julian Calendar) ministers of the Provisional Government were arrested, and the clock stopped.

11:50:34 The Small Dining Room

11:51:42 «В ЭТОЙ КОМНАТЕ В НОЧЬ С 25 НА 26 ОКТЯБРЯ (7–8 НОЯБРЯ) 1917 ГОДА КРАСНОГВАРДЕЙЦЫ, СОЛДАТЫ И МАТРОСЫ, ВЗЯВШИЕ ШТУРМОМ ЗИМНИЙ ДВОРЕЦ, АРЕСТОВАЛИ КОНТРРЕВОЛЮЦИОННОЕ БУРЖУАЗНОЕ ВРЕМЕННОЕ ПРАВИТЕЛЬСТВО.» — “In this room the night of 25–26 October (7-8 November) 1917, the Red Guards, soldiers and sailors, took by storm the Winter Palace, arrested the counterrevolutionary bourgeois Provisional Government.” The clock stopped at 2.10am, the time that the Revolution took place, on 26 October 1917 (Julian Calendar)/8 November 1917 (Gregorian Calendar).

11:52:08 The Small Dining Room
Next, we went into the Malachite Room (65)—

11:52:58 The Malachite Room

11:54:22 The Malachite Room

11:54:46 The Malachite Room
—then the Concert Hall (67).

11:55:36 The Concert Hall

11:56:42 The Reliquary of St. Alexander Nevsky (1747-52, the St. Petersburg Mint — silver; cast, chased and engraved) in the Concert Hall
From there we entered a long corridor: the Portrait Gallery of the House of the Romanovs (69).

11:57:54 Portrait of Nicholas II by Ilya Repin (1895, oil on canvas)

11:57:54 Same portrait, straightened up

11:58:38 Nikolai Bodarevski: Portrait of Tsarina Alexandra Feodorovna (1907, oil on canvas)

11:59:28 The Portrait Gallery of the House of the Romanovs

11:59:46

12:00:08 Grand Duke Mikhail Alexandrovich (1832-1909) — by Ernest von Liphart

12:00:22

12:01:50

12:03:16

12:03:36

12:04:00, according to one camera: Louis Tocqué, Portrait of Empress Elizabeth Petrovna (1758, oil on canvas)

12:04:02, according to the other camera

12:04:56

12:08:12
From there we went to the Pavilion Hall (72).

12:10:00 The Pavilion Hall

12:11:06

12:12:00

12:11:48 “We’ve been there!”

12:12:36 The Peacock Clock

12:13:18 Mosaic floor

12:13:44 Looking out at the Hanging Garden

12:14:02

12:14:48

12:15:22

12:15:38
The Pavilion Hall (72) looked out onto the long Hanging Garden (73).

12:16:08

12:16:44


12:16:32


12:18:42

12:18:56
The Pavilion Hall led on to the Upper Landing of the Council Staircase (75), the most noticeable feature of which was a great malachite vase, and on the opposite side was a door to the Room of Italian Art of the 13th to early 15th century (76).

12:19:46 Malachite vase on the the Upper Landing of the Council Staircase

12:20:24 Room of Italian Art of the 13th to early 15th century

12:21:14
From there we went into the Room of Italian Art of the 16th Century (78).

12:22:04 Giovanni Battista Cima da Conegliano (ca.1459–ca.1517): The Annunciation (1495)

12:22:24 Giorgione (ca.1477/8–1510): Judith and Holofernes (1505)

12:23:12 Sebastiano del Piombo (Sebastiano Luciani) (1485–1547): Christ Carrying the Cross
And we went through the Titian Room (79)—

12:24:34 Titian (Tiziano Vecellio) (ca.1488–1576): The Penitent Mary Magdalene
—on the way to the Leonardo da Vinci Room (77).

12:26:20 Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519): Madonna and Child (Madonna Benois)

12:27:10 The Leonardo da Vinci Room

12:28:28 Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519): Madonna and Child (The Litta Madonna), tempera on canvas (transferred from wood)

12:29:16 Giampietrino (Gian Pietro Rizzoli) (active 1508–1549): The Repentant Magdalene (oil on wood) — not as penitent as Titian’s!
After that we went along the Raphael Loggias (82)—

12:31:32 Entering the Raphael Loggias

12:32:12 The Raphael Loggias, with the vaults painted with scenes from the Bible—

12:33:06 The Raphael Loggias, with the vaults painted with scenes from the Bible—

12:33:30 The Raphael Loggias, with the vaults painted with scenes from the Bible—

12:34:44 —and the walls decorated with grotesque creatures

12:34:54
—turning right about halfway down to pass through the Small Italian Skylight Room (85)—

12:35:18 The Small Italian Skylight Room

12:37:06 Massimo Stanzione (ca.1586–ca.1656): Cleopatra

12:37:50 Carlo Dolci (1616–1686): St. Cicilia (1670)
—into the Large Italian Skylight Room (87)—

12:38:40 The Large Italian Skylight Room

12:40:08 Giovanni Antonio Canal (Canaletto) (1697–1768): Reception of the French Ambassador in Venice (1740s)
—then turning left to enter the Gallery of the History of Ancient Painting (90).

12:41:26 The Gallery of the History of Ancient Painting, looking left

12:41:38 The Gallery of the History of Ancient Painting, looking right
On the opposite side of the Gallery was the Main Staircase of the New Hermitage (91), but we didn’t go that way.

12:41:58 The Main Staircase of the New Hermitage

12:42:08 The Main Staircase of the New Hermitage

12:42:50 Antonio Canova (1757–1822): Kiss of Cupid and Psyche (1794–1797) — in the Gallery of the History of Ancient Painting
We went by way of the Spanish Cabinet (88)—

12:45:48 Alonso Sánchez Coello (1531/1532–1588): The Portrait of Infanta Catalina Micaela of Austria (1583–1585) — I thought it looked more like Rowan Atkinson!
—and the Rembrandt Room (98)—

12:52:46 Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (1606–1669): Abraham’s Sacrifice (1635, oil on canvas)
—down by the Council Staircase (75, 6)—

12:54:18
—to the Twenty-Column Hall (5) with granite columns and stone mosaic floor—

12:57:16 The Twenty-Column Hall

12:58:02 Mosaic floor of the Twenty-Column Hall
—then into the Room of the Great Vase (3) — a huge jasper vase 2.57 metres high.

12:59:16 The Room of the Great Vase
We proceeded along a long corridor lined with Roman bas-reliefs—

13:00:50 Ganymede and the Eagle (Roman work, 1st century AD, marble)

13:01:34 Orestes killing Aegisthus and Clytemnestra (Roman work, second half of the 2nd century AD, marble)

13:02:14 Artemis (Roman work, early 2nd century AD, marble)
—through the Room of Ancient Egypt (2)—

13:04:08 Egyptian funerary text (“book of the dead”)

13:04:20 Another Egyptian funerary text (“book of the dead”)

13:04:32 Egyptian mummy-case

13:04:58 Egyptian mummy-cases
—and into the Great Courtyard of the Winter Palace, which had an exit to the Palace Square.

13:18:26 Great Courtyard of the Winter Palace. Sculpture: Enrique Martinez Celaya, The Tower of Snow (2011, bronze)

We were the only ones to return to the hotel,” Janet wrote. All the others went their own separate ways, so we were the only ones on the coach. “[John] had done really well in the museum, bless him,” Janet continued. “He was really suffering when we left, though. Back at the hotel we had a wash-and-brush-up then went down to the bar for a drink.” I had a glass of «Балтика 7», brewed locally, on draught. (It’s available back home, in bottles, at Wetherspoons.) “We decided we’d get the Metro to a stop near St. Isaac’s, but in the end [John] realised he really did NOT feel well enough to go out. I was SO disappointed. I mulled over the idea of going off on my own but finally realised it wouldn’t be a good idea. [John] returned to the room and I decided to go to ‘Norman’s’ for another bottle of Pepsi Diet plus a bar of chocolate to take home to try. I took 200 Roubles… I had a good browse around. I got the Pepsi and saw the bar of chocolate I wanted, then decided that if I had enough left I would get [John] something — probably some crisps — in the hope that he would eat them and it would cheer him up a bit. I knew he was upset we couldn’t go out. I don’t blame him. It’s amazing that we’re here. He does REALLY well, puts up with a lot of pain and discomfort and lack of mobility and very rarely complains. I chose a biggish packet of Russian crisps that I guessed would be ‘salami’ flavour. Back at the hotel, [John] was really chuffed with them (sausage flavour!) and ate them. I was SO pleased. And I felt better for my little ‘jolly’! It really didn’t bother me at all going in the shop on my own. I enjoyed the experience and the novelty of browsing around a small Russian supermarket.…”


The first item must be the carrier bag, then there’s Пепси Лайт (Pepsi Light), very cheap at 39.90, Чипсы (“chipsy”, chips
[British English: crisps]), and Шоколад (“shokolad”, chocolate).

15:40:42 «Охотничьи колбаски» (“hunting sausages” — the same, then, as the Polish “Kielbasa Myśliwska” that I enjoyed a long time ago from the delicatessen counter that used to be on Freeman Street market, Grimsby) «чипсы к пиву» (“chips
[British English: crisps] for beer”). Sausage-flavoured crisps…

15:47:46 …from “Norman’s”

“The cleaner stumped up so we went down to the bar for a drink,” Janet wrote — I had another «Балтика 7». “[John] was feeling better.… We then returned to our room and the cleaner had finished. [John] lay on the bed with his feet elevated and is now sound asleep. it is 5.50pm. Tomorrow we have a day excursion to Pushkin. We leave at 9am so I’ve booked a wake-up call for 7am… At 7.15pm we went for dinner. We were put at a different table. Only us. [John was] really NOT well. Could barely eat his meal. We were back in our room before 8pm. [John] crashed on the bed and I had a shower and updated this. I then channel-hopped. Fascinating. Gratifying to know that Russian telly is as crappy as ours!… Since we returned from dinner [John] has been lying on his bed reading.” I was reading Wind and Flame, a history of the Pentecostal movement by Donald Gee, published in 1967.
[Friday 14 September 2012]



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